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Dr. George M. Murray

Research Associate Professor, MS&E
Center for Laser Applications
University of Tennessee Space Institute
Tullahoma, TN 37388-9700
Phone: (931) 393-7487 

Website

Curriculum Vitae

Education

  • University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN. September 1982 to June 1988. Ph.D. in analytical chemistry.
  • University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN September 1979 to August 1982. Graduated with honors. B.A. in chemistry.
  • University of the South, Sewanee, TN. August 1971 to June 1972.

Professional Experience

  • University of Tennessee Space Institute. May 2008 to present. Research Associate Professor. The responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to: graduate level teaching, performing research, soliciting external funding for research projects and directing the research efforts of graduate students.
  • Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. August 1998 to 2004. Senior Professional Chemist. June 2004 to May 2008. Principal Professional Chemist. May 2005 to May 2008. Section Supervisor, Applied Chemistry. The responsibilities of the position include: supervision, technical consultations with laboratory clients, training of laboratory personnel, analytical methods development and research.
  • Johns Hopkins University. January 2001 to May 2008. Lecturer.
  • University of Maryland Baltimore County. July 1998 to June 2003. Adjunct Associate Professor. Directed graduate student researchers and teaching.
  • University of Maryland Baltimore County. July 1992 to July 1998. Associate Professor. The responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to: undergraduate and graduate level teaching, performing research, soliciting external funding for research projects and directing the research efforts of undergraduate and graduate students.
  • Ames Laboratory, Ames, IA. June 1990 to June 1992. Associate Chemist. The position's primary purpose was the development of spectroscopic techniques for the determination of Special Nuclear Materials for the Nuclear Safeguards and Security Program. The analysis methods developed were based on optical techniques that utilized the selectivity afforded by extremely narrow bandwidth tunable lasers.
  • Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN. September 1988 to June 1990. Research Associate. The position was to synthesize and spectroscopically investigate complexes and compounds of the lanthanides and actinides to understand the F block elements more fully. The methods used included UV/VIS, FT-IR, Laser Fluorescence, X-Ray Crystallography, and others.
  • University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN. June 1986 to August 1988. Research Associate. The position was to develop and use free energy minimization computer algorithms to investigate the secondary water chemistry of nuclear power plants, under contract to the Tennessee Valley Authority.

Courses Taught

  • Electro-Analytical Chemistry, UMCP.
  • Analytical Spectroscopy, UMBC.
  • Special Topics in Chemistry: Introduction to Polymer Chemistry, UMBC.
  • Special Topics in Chemistry: Environmental Chemistry and Analysis, UMBC.
  • Introduction to Polymer Science, JHU.
  • Biomimetics in Biomedical Engineering, JHU.
  • Polymeric Materials, JHU.

Research

The techniques of molecular imprinting and sensitized lanthanide luminescence have been combined to create the basis for a sensor that can selectively measure a specific organophosphorous compound.  A complex of polymerizable sensitizing ligand europium (III) and an organophosphorous compound are copolymerized in a cross-linked polymer matrix.  The best coordinators are trifluoromethyl substituted b-diketones.  The best polymerization mechanism is by Reversible Addition Fragmentation Transfer polymerization.  This approach is allowing the production of soluble processable imprinted materials.  Analogous methodologies are currently being applied to the production of sensors for the detection and determination of drugs of abuse, explosives and meat spoilage.  Drugs are measured in an analogous manner to the nerve agents while the explosives are being detected by the production of charge-transfer complexes between the explosives molecules, (acceptor) and immobilized amines (donor).  Meat spoilage sensing is obtained using luminescence from a transition metal macrocyclic complex.  The materials are also capable of providing highly selective binding sites to other transducers such as quartz crystal microbalance and surface plasmon resonance sensors.

An additional thrust is to develop new solid phase extractants for the removal of metal ions from environmental and wastewater and to serve as the basis for selective ion sensors.  Rather than continuing to test existing extractants by an Edisonian approach in the hope that an excellent extractant may be found, we rely on chemical insights into what makes a good extractant.  The sources of these insights include coordination number, coordination geometry, ionic size, ionic shape, and thermodynamic affinity.  Selectivity is obtained by providing the polymeric extractants with cavities lined with complexing ligands so arranged as to match the charge, coordination number, coordination geometry, and size of the metal ion.  Using the metal ion as a template around which polymerizable monomeric complexing ligands are polymerized produces these cavity-containing polymers.  The complexing ligands are ones containing functional groups known to form highly stable complexes with a specific metal ion and less stable complexes with other cations.  We have developed sequestering agents for lead and uranium as well as electrochemical and optical sensors based on this approach.  We are now applying this experience in selectivity toward preparing other form factors such as imprinted ion exchange resin beads.

Publications

Southard, G. E., Van Houten, K. A., Ott. Jr., E. W. and Murray, G. M, "Synthetic and Spectroscopic Characterization of Molecularly Imprinted Polymer Phosphonate Sensors," in Polymers and Materials for Anti-Terrorism and Homeland Defense, ACS Symposium Series, Reynolds, J G. and Lawson, G. E., Eds., American Chemical Society, Washington, D. C., 2008.

Southard, G. E., Van Houten, K. A and Murray, G. M, "Soluble and Processable Phosphonate Sensing Star Molecularly Imprinted Polymers," Macromolecules, 40 (5) 1395-1400 (2007).

Southard, G. E., Ott Jr., E. W. Van Houten, K. A and Murray, G. M, "Luminescent Sensing of Organophosphates Using Imprinted Polymers Prepared by RAFT Polymerization," Analytica Chimica Acta, 581 (2) 202-207 (2007).

Southard, G. E., Van Houten, K. A. and Murray, G. M., "Heck Cross-Coupling for Synthesizing Metal Complexing Monomers," Synthesis, 2006 (15) 2475-2477 (2006).

Southard, G. E. and Murray, G. M., "Synthesis of Vinyl Substituted βBeta-Diketones for Polymerizable Metal Complexes," Journal of Organic Chemistry, 70 (22) 9036-9039 (2005).

 Bell, L. M. and Murray, G. M., "Selective Photo-reduction of N-nitrosamines Combined with Micellar Electrokinetic Chromatography and Laser Fluorimetric Detection," Journal of Chromatography, B., 826, 160-168 (2005).

Owens, G. S., Southard, G. E., Van Houten, K. A. and Murray, G. M., "Molecularly Imprinted Ion Exchange Resin for Fe3+, Separation Science and Technology, 40, 2205-2211 (2005).

Kimaro, A, Kelly, L. A. and Murray, G. M., "Synthesis and Characterization of Molecularly Imprinted Uranyl Ion Exchange Resins," Separation Science and Technology, 40, 2035-2052 (2005).

Murray, G. M. and Southard G. E., “Metal Ion Selective Molecularly Imprinted Materials,” in Molecular Imprinting: Science and Technology, Yan, M. and Ramstrom, O., Eds., Marcel Dekker, 2005.

Murray, G. M. and Southard, G. E., “Optical Transduction Schemes for Imprinted Polymer Sensors,” in Molecularly Imprinted Materials, Kofinas, P., Roberts, M. J., Sellergren, B. Eds., Materials Research Society Symposium Series Volume 787, Warrendale, PA, 2004.

Boyd, J. W., Cobb, G. P., Southard, G. E. and Murray, G. M. “Development of Molecularly Imprinted Polymer Sensors for Chemical Warfare Agents,” JHUAPL Technical Digest, 25, 44-49 (2004).

Murray, G. M. and Southard, G. E., "Synthetic and Spectroscopic Characterization of Molecularly Imprinted Polymer Phosphonate Sensors," Polymer Preprints, 45(1) 535-536 (2004).

Perry, A. S. and Murray, G. M., "In-line Fiber Optic Light Filter," Applied Spectroscopy, 57, 722-723 (2003).

Murray, G. M. and Southard, G. E., “Molecularly Imprinted Ionomers,” in Molecularly Imprinted Materials-Sensors and Other Devices, Shea, K. J., Yan, M., Roberts, M. J., Eds., Materials Research Society Symposium Series Volume 723, Warrendale, PA, 2002.

Murray, G. M. and Southard, G. E., "Sensors for Chemical Weapons Detection," IEEE Instrumentation and Measurement Magazine, 5(4) 12-21 (2002).

Murray G. M. and Southard, G. E. "Molecularly Imprinted Ionomers, M3.3" MRS Proceedings Volume 723, 2002.

Kimaro, A., Kelly, L. A. and Murray G. M., Molecularly Imprinted Ionically Permeable Membrane for Uranyl Ion, Chemical Communications, 1282-1283 (2001).